4 things we misunderstand about marijuana when we think of it like alcohol

https://globalnews.ca/news/5199498/marijuana-alcohol-differences/

 

4 things we misunderstand about marijuana when we think of it like alcohol

140106_cain.jpg?quality=60&strip=all&w=4By Patrick CainNational Online Journalist, News  Global News

WATCH: Marijuana edibles — everything you need to know

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For better or worse, alcohol has a long-entrenched role in western culture.

As cannabis has been treated more tolerantly in recent years and was fully legalized last fall, it’s become more available to a group of people whose habits and assumptions have been formed by alcohol consumption.

And that has its pitfalls, an expert explains.

“Relying on experience for alcohol with cannabis is really quite a failure because it’s not the same experience,” says B.C.-based cannabis breeder Ryan Lee.

“We don’t have a very good context in society for teaching people how to use (cannabis) and we kind of let them out into the world to experiment with it assuming that it’s just like alcohol, and it’s not — it’s a different substance.”

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Lee is the founder of Chemovar Health, a cannabis genetics company.

Here are four expectations that more or less work with alcohol but are misleading with cannabis:

Expecting it to work similarly in different people

Two people can share a joint and find that it makes one of them chatty and hyper and the other more sedated. Alcohol tends to have much more uniform effects across different people.

“People have this genetic variation kind of built into the species, and that results in differently functioning enzymes in different people,” Lee says.

“We see that there’s a huge variability in how intoxicated people get, how off-balance people get,” he explains. “It’s really not a one-to-one thing like we see with alcohol. It really varies from person to person.”

“Two people might take the exact same thing but have very different experiences.”

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Expecting quick feedback (with edibles)

One classic mistake new users make with edibles is expecting prompt feedback.

It works pretty well with alcohol if you’re paying attention. Should I pour a bit more wine? Or set it aside for now? Your body should give you the information you need if you stop and listen for it.

People new to edibles often expect the same kind of response, which can lead them to make a classic mistake.

“People take edibles, then 45 minutes later they don’t feel anything, and so they decide that they didn’t have enough and they’re going to have more. Then, 15 minutes later, the first one starts to kick in, and they’ve essentially just double-dosed,” Lee says.

“One of the reasons you can drink alcohol and almost immediately start to feel the effects is that alcohol is absorbed through the stomach lining, and (edible) cannabis isn’t. It needs to go through the gastrointestinal tract and down through the lower GI into the intestine before it’s absorbed. It goes through the first pass of the metabolism through the liver, and that also takes time. It’s a very different paradigm from alcohol.”

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Expecting cannabis to have one kind of effect

Many experienced users say that terpenes, the chemicals that give different strains a different taste and smell, also give strains different psychoactive effects — sometimes all at the same time.

This is often called the “entourage effect.” Some in the cannabis community think it’s real, others don’t. Science, so far, is silent.

“Different types of cannabis feel differently as a result of these complex mixtures of different chemicals, flavour chemicals, but that hasn’t been shown in a double-blind study,” Lee says.

“I’m convinced that they do, but that’s not good enough for many people in the scientific community.”

READ MORE: Linalool, Isopulegol — Behind the oddly named terpenes that affect how your pot affects you

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Expecting levels of THC to match levels of intoxication

For many years, blood alcohol levels have been the key to measuring whether someone has drunk too much to drive. The courts have supported it because the science supports it.

If THC could be measured in a similar way, and if the measurements meant something similar, cannabis-impaired driving would be a simpler problem to address. (Fortunately, there’s no evidence that legalization has caused it to increase.)

READ MORE: No spike in cannabis-impaired driving charges 6 months after legalization — RCMP

The problem is that it can’t very easily at the roadside, and they don’t.

It means that while finding the presence of THC is pretty easy, finding out what it means is a lot harder. Investigators can measure levels of THC in a driver’s body during an autopsy, but it’s close to impossible to figure out whether it was impairing.

“We have this huge body of evidence to suggest that three beers, over xamount of time, in a person of a given weight, equals this effect,” Lee says. “I don’t think that we’ve done these preliminary studies of cannabis very well.”

In turn, that means that Canadian courts are likely to spend a lot of time and energy over the next few years figuring out whether or not to uphold laws on cannabis-impaired driving.

 

Smoking cannabis motivates people to WORKOUT and could be new ‘runner’s high’

We need to get the message out there about the many different cannabis varieties and what they do.

https://www.mirror.co.uk/science/smoking-cannabis-motivates-people-workout-14980281

 

It’s usually associated with feelings of laziness, but it seems that smoking cannabis actually helps many people to get active .

Researchers from the University of Colorado Boulder have revealed that many cannabis users say that the drug motivates them to workout, and makes exercise more enjoyable.

Professor Angela Bryan, a senior author of the study, said: “There is a stereotype that cannabis use leads people to be lazy and couch-locked and not physically active, but these data suggest that this is not the case.

“The evidence is not there yet. But I am also not convinced it is harmful.”

 

Cannabis can motivate people to workout (Image: Getty)

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In the study, the researchers surveyed 600 cannabis users in California, Colorado, Nevada, Oregon and Washington about whether they had used cannabis within one hour before, or four hours after exercise.

Surprisingly, 82% said yes.

 

The survey also revealed that 70% said cannabis increased their enjoyment of exercise, 78% said it boosted recovery, and 52% said it increased their motivation to workout.

 

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However, only 38% said cannabis boosted their performance.

While the reason for these findings remains unclear, the researchers suggest that cannabis may make exercise more enjoyable by reducing pain.

Dr Arielle Gillman, who also worked on the study, said: “There is evidence to suggest that certain cannabinoids dampen pain perception, and we also know that the receptors cannabis binds to in the brain are very similar to the receptors that are activated naturally during the runners high.

 

Teen smoking cannabis (Image: AFP)

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Elderly people should take MARIJUANA to ease aches and pains, study claims

 

“Theoretically, you could imagine that if it could dampen pain and induce an artificial ‘runner’s high,’ it could keep people motivated.”

While the results are preliminary, the researchers suggest that cannabis could encourage more older adults to get active.

Professor Bryan added: “As we get older, exercise starts to hurt, and that is one reason older adults don’t exercise as much. If cannabis could ease pain and inflammation, helping older adults to be more active that could be another benefit.”

Smoking cannabis motivates people to WORKOUT and could be new ‘runner’s high’ Cannabis is usually linked to feelings of laziness, but a new survey suggests that this may not be the case for many users

We need to get the message out there about the many different cannabis varieties and what they do.

https://www.mirror.co.uk/science/smoking-cannabis-motivates-people-workout-14980281

 

It’s usually associated with feelings of laziness, but it seems that smoking cannabis actually helps many people to get active .

Researchers from the University of Colorado Boulder have revealed that many cannabis users say that the drug motivates them to workout, and makes exercise more enjoyable.

Professor Angela Bryan, a senior author of the study, said: “There is a stereotype that cannabis use leads people to be lazy and couch-locked and not physically active, but these data suggest that this is not the case.

“The evidence is not there yet. But I am also not convinced it is harmful.”

 
4_Couple-jogging-in-park-in-autumn.jpg

Cannabis can motivate people to workout (Image: Getty)

READ MORE

 

In the study, the researchers surveyed 600 cannabis users in California, Colorado, Nevada, Oregon and Washington about whether they had used cannabis within one hour before, or four hours after exercise.

Surprisingly, 82% said yes.

 

The survey also revealed that 70% said cannabis increased their enjoyment of exercise, 78% said it boosted recovery, and 52% said it increased their motivation to workout.

3_MIRROR-VIDEO-THUMBNAIL-TEMPLATE.jpg
 
CLICK TO PLAY

WOMAN WHO GREW HER OWN CANNABIS TO COPE WITH CHRONIC PAIN WANTS TO HELP OTHERS

 

 

READ MORE

 

However, only 38% said cannabis boosted their performance.

While the reason for these findings remains unclear, the researchers suggest that cannabis may make exercise more enjoyable by reducing pain.

Dr Arielle Gillman, who also worked on the study, said: “There is evidence to suggest that certain cannabinoids dampen pain perception, and we also know that the receptors cannabis binds to in the brain are very similar to the receptors that are activated naturally during the runners high.

 
1_FILES-This-file-photo-taken-on-April-1

Teen smoking cannabis (Image: AFP)

READ MORE

 

“Theoretically, you could imagine that if it could dampen pain and induce an artificial ‘runner’s high,’ it could keep people motivated.”

While the results are preliminary, the researchers suggest that cannabis could encourage more older adults to get active.

Professor Bryan added: “As we get older, exercise starts to hurt, and that is one reason older adults don’t exercise as much. If cannabis could ease pain and inflammation, helping older adults to be more active that could be another benefit.”

‘Wheelchair-Bound’ Man Launches Human Rights Complaint Over Legal Weed Regime

https://www.vice.com/en_ca/article/3k3bmk/wheelchair-bound-man-launches-human-rights-complaint-over-legal-weed-regime

 

Ken Harrower says Ontario’s cannabis retail system is too expensive, not accessible, and doesn’t carry the products he needs.

 

A Toronto man whose medical conditions require him to use a wheelchair is launching a human rights complaint arguing that Ontario’s legal recreational cannabis system is discriminatory against people who have disabilities or have low income.

Ken Harrower, 57, uses cannabis to treat symptoms from his joint disorder arthrogryposis multiplex congenita, as well as chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (an inflammation of the lungs), and celiac disease, according to a news release published by his lawyer.

Harrower cannot smoke weed. He needs to consume it by eating gluten-free edibles—which are not legally available for sale in Canada through either the medical or recreational systems—or by chewing raw cannabis. In addition to receiving funding from the Ontario Disability Support Program, Harrower panhandles to cover his expenses.

Harrower alleges the Ontario Cannabis Store, which is in charge of the province’s legal weed retail scheme, has discriminated against him because it’s too expensive for him, doesn’t carry the products he needs, and can’t provide him with on-demand access because the physical stores are closed on holidays. He said two of the brick and mortar stores in Toronto, Ameri and The Hunny Pot have turned him away because they are not wheelchair accessible, and are too far away from his home. There are no legal storefronts for medical cannabis patients—it remains online only.

VICE has reached out to Ontario Cannabis Store for comment but did not immediately receive a response.

In an email statement, Cameron Brown, spokesman for The Hunny Pot, told VICE the store offers a temporary ramp for customers with accessibility needs. He said the shop’s inventory is constantly being updated but that it is working to “satisfy all of our customers.” Brown also said the store can’t legally open on statutory holidays and that its location is transit friendly.

Harrower also said the province’s online retailer is discriminatory because it only accepts credit card payments, and has a prohibitive $5 shipping fee, which sometimes doubles his small orders. As a result, Harrower said he has been forced to shop at black market weed shops but he is concerned about being criminalized.

Harrower launched the challenge against the Attorney General of Ontario, the Office of the Premier of Ontario, and the Toronto Police Service through the Ontario Human Rights Tribunal.

“I am unable to access regulated products which would help me to alleviate my symptoms. I have been to the other newly-created retailers in Toronto and they turned me away,” Harrower said in the release. “The OCS cannot provide me with urgent, on-demand access and it is far too expensive for me. I am here today to help others facing a similar situation.”

Cannabis lawyer Jack Lloyd, who is working on the case, said Harrower has a right to access medicine in a dignified manner.

 

“The current recreational and medical cannabis models do not provide many individuals like Mr. Harrower with sufficient access to their medicine,” Lloyd said in the release. “It goes without saying that criminalizing people like Ken, or the compassionate people who supply him with his medical cannabis at a time when no functional access exists, is an insult to his dignity as a human being.”

Cannabis investor donates $9M to Harvard, MIT for marijuana research

But I bet whatever the findings, the UK / NHS will refuse to acknowledge the results and continue to deny patients saying their is no evidence.

https://www.foxnews.com/health/cannabis-investor-donates-9m-harvard-mit-marijuana-research

 

A cannabis investor is giving Harvard and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, his alma maters, $9 million to study the health effects of marijuana, according to published reports.

Both institutions describe the donation as the largest private funding of marijuana research, the Boston Globe reported.

 

“The lack of basic science research enables people to make claims in a vacuum that are either anecdotal or based on old science,” said the donor, Charles R. Broderick, to the Globe. “For generations we haven’t been able to study this thing for various sorts of societal reasons. That should end now, as well as the prohibitions that are falling around the world.”

One of the objectives of the research will be to determine the cognitive and psychological effects of marijuana.

Broderick began investing in the cannabis industry in Canada in 2015, then expanded to the U.S., the Globe reported.

Harvard and MIT maintain that Broderick’s financial interests in the cannabis industry will not influence their research. They say they will publicize their findings whether they conclude that marijuana helps or harms.

 

Broderick’s offer to finance the research initially was not met enthusiastically by Harvard, he conceded.

When he proposed funding a study over the telephone, he recalled: “There was silence on the other end. Then she said: ‘I don’t think we can do it.’ And I said, ‘That’s the problem.’”

But then his Harvard contact called back to inform him that his proposal had generated interest in university researchers focused on brain chemicals.

Meanwhile, the study of cannabis in academia is growing more common.

The expected boom in cannabis-related jobs has colleges responding with a range of offerings. Colorado State University offers a cannabis studies minor focusing on social, legal, political and health impacts. Ohio State University, Harvard, the University of Denver and Vanderbilt offer classes on marijuana policy and law.

Universities have done little research on marijuana because of federal restrictions, but that’s starting to change. UCLA’s Cannabis Research Initiative, which bills itself as one of the first academic programs in the world dedicated to the study of cannabis, has studies underway ranging from medical treatments to economic impacts.

 

Cannabis businesses range from medical and recreational marijuana to foods, fabrics and myriad other products derived from industrial hemp. The basis for all is the cannabis sativa plant. Marijuana is produced by varieties with high levels of THC, the chemical compound that makes people high. Hemp has only a trace of THC, but produces cannabidiol, or CBD, used in a broad range of nutritional and therapeutic products that are all the rage right now.

Marijuana is legal for medical purposes in 33 states and as a recreational drug in 10. While marijuana remains illegal federally, the 2018 Farm bill cleared the way for widespread cultivation of hemp.

 

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