Move to let folk doctors prescribe cannabis

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My last post see you next week, work calls thanks for popping in :yep:

 

Move to let folk doctors prescribe cannabis

 

 

New Public Health Minister Anutin Charnvirakul has ordered ministerial regulations to be revised in a bid to help assist 3,000 folk medicine practitioners, including activist Decha Siripat, to prescribe cannabis for treatment without violating narcotic laws.

 

Without the amendment, these practitioners will not be allowed to use cannabis because the 2018 Narcotic Act permits only professionals — such as medical doctors, pharmacists, dentists and licensed Thai traditional medical practitioners recognised by the Thai Traditional Medical Professions Act — to prescribe cannabis to their patients.

Mr Decha and 3,000 other practitioners only received a five-year-certificate from the Department of Thai Traditional and Alternative Medicine (DTTAM) to cure their patients, but they are not treated as professionals under the law.

 

If they want to acquire that status, they need to go into lengthy process — which takes a year or more — to get approval from the ministry of public health.  

“The amendment is an attempt to help users of cannabis for medical treatment. We want to  make sure that patients and medical practitioners of cannabis medical treatment will be free from legal problems,” Mr Anutin said on Sunday.

He said the amendment will add a clause that automatically includes these 3,000 practitioners under the Thai Traditional Medical Professions Act.  

A meeting was held after the Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) last Friday announced it could not approve the “Decha Oil” formula cannabis-extract oil because Mr Decha was not a professional under the act.

 

Mr Decha is president of the Khaokwan Foundation, a sustainable agriculture advocacy group. Three years ago he started giving away his own specifically formulated version of cannabis oil to patients for free.

 

The law revision will start next week and will be complete for Mr Anutin to sign in August, according to Rossana Tosittrakul, a former senator and representative of the Network of advocacy group on cannabis medical treatment, who attended the meeting on Sunday.

“The regulation amendment will clear technical barriers in laws that delay access of patients to cannabis treatment. We do not want to see thousands of patients wait in vain or die from waiting because the law has technical problem,” she said.

 

She said the meeting also discussed the transferal of ten thousands of patients who are waiting for Decha Oil to receive medical treatment from other facilities approved by the ministry of public health.

Mr Decha could return to provide his famous cannabis extract oil only after his status is legal and his cannabis extract oil is approved by the FDA, according to Ms Rossana.

 

https://www.bangkokpost.com/thailand/general/1716355/move-to-let-folk-doctors-prescribe-cannabis

 

Bongme 

 

Two arrested at Green Pride cannabis event in Brighton

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Two arrested at Green Pride cannabis event in Brighton

 

HUNDREDS of campaigners brazenly took drugs in front of police – but only two were arrested.

Medicinal and recreational cannabis users took part in the Green Pride event at Preston Park on Saturday.

Whilst stalls sold CBD products made from legal strains of the plant – many of the attendees took pot luck by happily sparking up in front of police.

As the pungent smell of cannabis smoke floated over the park it was clear many people were not keeping off the grass as groups made a joint effort to discuss the benefits of the drug.

The event was held to campaign for legalisation of cannabis both for medicinal and recreational purposes.

One woman who lives in the North Laine area of Brighton but declined to be named told how her late husband had used cannabis whilst dying from lung cancer.

She said: “He had chemotherapy and had been told it was terminal. I researched everything and came across cannabis oil.

“It alleviated his symptoms and meant he was able to enjoy the last weeks of his life.

“We were able to go out and do things together.

 

“I do smoke cannabis now and grow a couple of plants at home.

“I’m not smoking today because this is about getting the important messages across.

“But cannabis is no where near as dangerous as alcohol or many prescription drugs like Tramadol. “

Alex McDonald, 29, recently moved from Sheffield to Brighton and invited his friends to join him at the event.

“For me I use it both medically and recreationally.

“It’s a lifestyle choice rather than a necessity.

 

“But from a street level it is much more dangerous. It is being advertised with names like bubblegum to younger and younger children.

“I think it should be legalised so you know exactly what you are getting.

Charlotte Robey, 49, vouched for capsules of cannabis oil removing all symptoms of the menopause.

Dominic Clarke, 27, of Sheffield said: “I am a diagnosed paranoid schizophrenic, but since taking cannabis I have not taken any medication.

“The evidence I have from personal experienced, is that I was diagnosed before I started smoking it. Now since smoking it, cannabis has brought me back down to a base level.”

Shannon Lousie, 19, was smoking a large strong smelling roll-up which she happily admitted contained illegal cannabis. She was happily puffing away alongside a large group of friends when four PCSOs approached them – giving them leaflets warning that cannabis is illegal and would not be tolerated at the event.

However they were not searched or arrested.

 

Shannon said: “I have been smoking it since I was 13 or 14. I don’t smoke a lot, just in the evening to chill out.

“Everyone is smoking here and no one is causing any trouble.”

Another woman who did not wish to be named because of ongoing legal matters said she used cannabis to treat her 21-year-old daughter’s epilepsy.

 

She said: “She has epilepsy which means she has fit.. She has been given so many different pharmaceutical treatments and cannabis has had more of an affect than any of them.

“I have been campaigning to my MP and her neurologist. “

 

Sussex Police said they made two arrests during the event and around 30 interventions where drugs were confiscated – but added that the event caused “minimal disruption”.

Chief Inspector Chris Veale said: “We were able to actively engage with a number of groups, clubs and individuals associated with Green Pride, many of whom had travelled from across the UK.

“This enabled us to set the tone early and give people the opportunity to make the right decision based on the information provided. We made it clear that we would facilitate lawful protest, however we were also there to safeguard the public, particularly young people and children and to enforce the law, and most people responded positively to our engagement.

“There was a calm community feel throughout the day, and the vast majority of those in attendance were well mannered and good spirited. The peaceful crowd was reflected by the low level of law enforcement.”

 

One man was arrested on suspicion of possession with intent to supply cannabis and one man was arrested on suspicion of possession of cannabis and are in custody.

Police made around 30 interventions where cannabis was seized from people and dealt with by various ways including community resolutions.

Five teenagers were referred to the youth outreach service and their parents contacted.

 

 

https://www.theargus.co.uk/news/17784576.two-arrested-green-pride-cannabis-event-brighton/

 

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Bongme 

Calls to bring hemp crops back to Scotland to boost economy and aid environment

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Calls to bring hemp crops back to Scotland to boost economy and aid environment

 

TRUDI Tompson devoted her final months to bringing hemp back to Scottish fields.

Now her husband aims to convince Scotland’s party of government to help reintroduce the crop to beat climate change, economic decline and cancer.

Geoff Tompson, 70, told the Sunday National: “I’d be delighted to see this realised for her. It’s something that’s worthy of support and would benefit Scotland.”

Once commonly grown across the UK, industrial strains of hemp are far removed from those exploited by the illegal drug trade, with low levels of the compounds which cause a “high”.

 

Currently subject to a strict Home Office licensing regime, it was cultivated in Fife from the 1000s to the 1700s, and was also grown in Caithness, the Lothians, the Outer Hebrides and Galloway thanks to its versatility, strength and ease of production.

The plant’s long fibres were turned into ropes and sails, fuelling the development of the country’s fishing fleets. As well as clothing, animal feed and papermaking, modern uses for industrial hemp include building materials, biofuels, health foods and toiletries.

Additionally, it is the target of cutting-edge research aimed at delivering new treatments for cancer.

Trudi’s condition was diagnosed less than six months after the couple reunited.

 

They first met 39 years earlier while training for roles in the RAF, and lost touch as their careers took different paths, with Geoff becoming a navigator and Melbourne-born Trudi a Russian linguist.

Undergoing surgery, chemotherapy and using alternative therapies, she beat the condition for eight years and six months, dying last autumn at the age of 66.

 

They first met 39 years earlier while training for roles in the RAF, and lost touch as their careers took different paths, with Geoff becoming a navigator and Melbourne-born Trudi a Russian linguist.

Undergoing surgery, chemotherapy and using alternative therapies, she beat the condition for eight years and six months, dying last autumn at the age of 66.

 

According to plant expert Dr Max Coleman of the Royal Botanic Gardens Edinburgh, it’s a sound case. He said: “It’s an incredibly useful plant and was in the past incredibly

important across the UK. We should recognise that potential. It will grow perfectly well in Scotland – maybe with climate change it will grow better than it did before. Hemp is a pretty trouble-free crop, there aren’t many things that bother it. It’s something we should be considering.”

The Sunday National asked the Home Office how many licences are currently in effect for the cultivation of industrial hemp, and how many of these relate to land in Scotland, but the department said that information wasn’t available.

But a 2018 report by the United Nations revealed the UK is the world’s biggest producer and exporter of legal cannabis, sending 2.1 of its total 95 tonne total overseas in 2016. Most of that is in the form of the Sativex medical drug.

 

Trudi, who had tumours in her lungs, ribs, spine and brain, was denied the chance to take medical cannabis by the Home Office. Her MP Brendan O’Hara, who made the request, is “fully behind” the appeal to the SNP membership. He said: “If the Scottish Government had responsibility for issuing licences for the commercial production of hemp, it could have important economic benefits.

“Industrial hemp does not contain the psychoactive substances that other cannabis plants have and so there is absolutely no link between commercial cultivation of hemp and illegal drug use. It is time we had a considered debate on this issue and hope that starts in Aberdeen in October.”

 

https://www.thenational.scot/news/17784059.calls-bring-hemp-crops-back-scotland-boost-economy-aid-environment/

 

 

Bongme 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Smuggling nightmare ends for Murray’s cannabis oil

 

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Smuggling nightmare ends for Murray’s cannabis oil

 

The Scotsman

 

Karen Gray with Murray who is now able to play and attend school. Photograph: Lisa Ferguson

 

The mother of a six-year-old who admitted to smuggling an illegal cannabis-based drug into the country to treat her son’s epilepsy has become the first person to source the drug legally in Scotland.

Karen Gray previously travelled to the Netherlands every few months to buy oil from the whole cannabis plant, which contains the active ingredient, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC).

 

The 44-year-old smuggled it to the UK, as it is the only treatment she has found to improve her son Murray’s debilitating seizures.

Gray, from Edinburgh feared she would be caught by Customs officials.

 

She is now “hugely relieved” as an anonymous supplier has obtained a licence from the Home Office to import the drug legally and sell it through a pharmacy in Glasgow.

“It’s amazing news,” said Gray. “We knew we’d get pulled at Customs eventually, it was always so stressful going through the airport.”

The supplier has agreed to source both types of cannabis oil Murray is currently taking: Bedrolite, with cannabidiol (CBD) and a small amount of THC, and Bedrocan, which contains 22 per cent THC.

British law was changed last year to allow prescription of medical cannabis, but only containing CBD, not THC. The British Paediatric Neurology Association says that THC may negatively affect brain development, structure and mental health.

 

Murray received his first course of Epidiolex, a legal drug containing CBD, in August 2018. It appeared to work, but the positive effects subsided after three months and Murray was admitted to hospital in January unable to “eat, talk or walk.”

Gray said she thought her son “was going to die”, until a Dutch doctor prescribed a drug containing THC. Murray began treatment on Bedrolite in March, and Bedrocan in May.

He is still responding well to treatment and is now able to play and attend school.

Gray is campaigning to get Murray a prescription for the drugs on the NHS.

 

Even at cost price, a 10ml bottle of Bedrolite costs £170 and lasts just four days. The medication is costing Gray and her husband about £1,500 a month, which they are sourcing from donations.

“It’s been a huge struggle. The NHS need to step in and pay for it,” she said.

Gray is campaigning with another Scottish mother, Lisa Quarrell, whose son Cole Thomson also takes Bedrolite for epilepsy, which Quarrell has been able to source from a London practice.

Both mothers have called on Cabinet Secretary for Health Jeanne Freeman to authorise “compassionate funding” for the drug from NHS Scotland. They were both part of the group which successfully petitioned Downing Street last year to legalise medical cannabis, after gathering over 230,000 signatures.

Two children in England and Northern Ireland are now receiving NHS funding for Bedrolite under an exceptional licence, and Gray wants to see that extended to other children.

 

“The Scottish Government says there’s nothing they can do, but there is,” she said.

A Scottish Government spokesperson said: “It is not for the Scottish Government to intervene in prescribing decisions. If a clinician prescribed an approved Cannabis Based Product for Medicinal Use using an NHS prescription then it would be dispensed free of charge in Scotland.”

 

https://www.scotsman.com/health/smuggling-nightmare-ends-for-murray-s-cannabis-oil-1-4968449

 

Bongme 

 

Inside Britain’s secret cannabis cafes: As police turn a blind eye, drug dealers are setting up illegal cafes to peddle super-strength skunk on Britain’s high streets

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Inside Britain’s secret cannabis cafes: As police turn a blind eye, drug dealers are setting up illegal cafes to peddle super-strength skunk on Britain’s high streets

 

Daily Mail

 

Vid On Link

 

Drug dealers are setting up cafes to peddle super-strength cannabis on Britain’s high streets, an investigation by The Mail on Sunday can reveal.

The Amsterdam-style shops, which attract customers via social media, are popping up in cities across the country.

In a phenomenon reminiscent of Prohibition-era speakeasies in the US, our reporters found:

Young people packing the secret cafes every night to smoke joints;
One ‘entrepreneur’ has registered his cafe as a business at Companies House;
Some of the cafes are selling a powerful cannabis strain known as ‘Cali (California) weed’ for up to £40 per gram.

 

Last week, our reporters visited two cafes in London and found both doing a brisk trade. Rich Nerdz, in Shoreditch, East London, served one of our reporters some cannabis

 

Last week, our reporters visited two cafes in London and found both doing a brisk trade.

Rich Nerdz stands on a bustling high street and has a branded shop front. However, its tinted windows and the CCTV cameras monitoring the entrance ensure that most passers-by are oblivious to the venue’s real purpose.

 

It advertises itself on a private Instagram account – meaning new members must send a request to join – as ‘The New & 1st Ever (Cali) Gamers Cafe In The World…’, but doesn’t give away its location.

Rich Nerdz’s sole director, Khabeer Khan, 30, has registered it at Companies House as a bar serving food. He calls himself an ‘entrepreneur’.

 

 

Our reporters messaged the account, which boasts almost 12,000 followers, and were placed on a guest list with a booking time. After a series of messages, we were guided to the cafe on a busy road in Shoreditch, East London.

Our team was frisked before being shown into the plushly decorated interior, with a bar counter displaying cannabis pots, alongside soft drinks and snacks in fridges behind.

A menu offered a variety of strains including hybrid cannabis types such as ‘Gelato 41’, ‘Gusher’ and ‘Guava’.

We were served by one of four members of staff behind the bar, before being shown downstairs where users smoked spliffs, played computer games and chatted.

A second speakeasy-style cafe known as The Den was found operating in Limehouse, East London.

 

The venue, located under a railway arch, has the appearance of a large social club with about 50 people inside smoking cannabis at any one time.

Our reporters were able to buy a gram of ‘Guava’ cannabis for £30 from a menu of strains available at the counter.

The cafe also sold soft drinks, snacks and coffees from a large coffee machine.

 

Tests at a specialist laboratory discovered both samples contained only the psychoactive THC, without any of the moderating CBD.

In the UK, it is illegal to sell cannabis substances containing THC, with the drug classified as Class B alongside amphetamines and ketamine.

‘Cali’ cannabis is typically made from hybrid strains which can contain psychoactive THC levels of up to 70 per cent compared with 15 per cent in UK varieties. Producers have developed stronger strains without CBD to have a greater psychoactive effect – but experts have warned of the dangers.

Ian Hamilton, addiction lecturer at the University of York, said: ‘With no CBD, you could get a range of possible effects – you can feel more anxious and on edge.

‘That’s the least that could happen, and the worst is several symptoms similar to psychosis. Some people will be all right but for others who are inexperienced, it could have adverse effects. The difficulty is people won’t know in advance whether they’ll be all right.’

 

He added: ‘THC is like the accelerator and CBD is the brake on the car that reduces the high and the psychoactive effect.’

Other secret cannabis cafes have been located in cities such as Birmingham, Manchester, Leeds and Newcastle but it is understood the venues are more temporary. MPs and experts have previously criticised the police for effectively decriminalising cannabis by the back door, with the drug linked to a host of mental health problems.

The latest Home Office survey shows cannabis remains the most popular illegal drug in the UK, with an estimated 2.3 million people using it in 2017/18, followed by cocaine on 880,000.

The most recent Public Health England statistics show cannabis was the leading single cause for new cases at treatment centres with 25,169 in 2017/18, followed by non-crack cocaine opiates on 18,767.

 

Last night the Metropolitan Police promised to investigate our findings. Sergeant Rob Rai, of Tower Hamlets Police, said: ‘The operation of premises for the sale and consumption of cannabis, often referred to as “cannabis cafes”, is an issue we deal with proactively.’

 

A second speakeasy-style cafe known as The Den (pictured) was found operating in Limehouse, East London. The venue, located under a railway arch, has the appearance of a large social club with about 50 people inside smoking cannabis at any one time

 

 

Our team was frisked before being shown into the plushly decorated interior, with a bar counter displaying cannabis pots, alongside soft drinks and snacks in fridges behind.

 

 

 

 

As well as cannabis, Rich Nerdz also sold soft drinks, snacks and coffees from a large coffee machine (a menu at the cafe is pictured)

 

 

A menu at Rich Nerdz offered a variety of strains including hybrid cannabis types such as ¿Gelato 41¿, ¿Gusher¿ and ¿Guava¿. Our reporter was able to buy a gram of 'Gelato 41' (pictured)

 

 

Being let in was like starring in a cheesy spy film 

 

 

The instructions were elaborate but terse. Like actors in a hammy spy film, we were first requested to go to a bagel shop and await orders.

Then, right on cue, my mobile buzzed as a WhatsApp message was delivered. ‘Location is: 142 Bethnal Green Road. At arrival you will be by a bus stop.’

It was a two-minute walk across the heart of East London and we moved briskly. ‘Please stand by the bus stop as if your [sic] awaiting an arrival of a bus. Let us know you are there. You will be escorted in shortly.’

Once in position, we slipped into character, pretending to wait for the No 8. Suddenly, we heard the mechanical clank of shutters rising and we turned to see two doormen beckoning us inside what appeared to be an empty shop sandwiched between a vaping store and an estate agents.

 

 

The Mail on Sunday gained access to the illicit den, called Rich Nerdz, after responding to an advert on its Instagram page, which has 12,000 followers

 

After shaking hands and being frisked, we were led to a swish bar, the modern equivalent of a Prohibition-era speakeasy – except that this one served super-strength cannabis, in pots ranged across a counter, rather than hard liquor.

A blonde bartender invited us to look over the menu.

We chose ‘Gelato 41’, one of the most potent strains on the market, and an expensive £40 per gram.

As the bartender measured out our order, a screen behind her displayed the grainy feed from CCTV cameras monitoring the street outside.

Placing our cannabis and a couple of fizzy drinks on a tray, she then led us to a well-appointed basement area.

TV screens were fixed on to the walls and customers, sitting in booths, played computer games on PlayStations. Most, though, simply lounged around chatting and getting high.

One staff member told us that the cafe, which closes at midnight, would be selling its own food in a few weeks.

For now, they offer snacks and order in takeaways, so customers – who are required to spend a minimum of £40 between two – have no reason to leave.

 

As the bartender measured out our order, a screen behind her displayed the grainy feed from CCTV cameras monitoring the street outside

 

As groups of young men and women filtered inside, the room filled with the unmistakable aroma of marijuana. We spotted a rising US music star called Swoosh God, who has more than 80,000 followers on Instagram.

The rapper even filmed himself smoking joints in the cafe, later uploading the video to his Instagram page.

 

The Mail on Sunday gained access to the illicit den, called Rich Nerdz, after responding to an advert on its Instagram page, which has 12,000 followers.

It describes itself as ‘The New & 1st Ever (Cali) Gamers Cafe In The World… Coming To You From Shoreditch, East London’, before adding: ‘DM [direct message] To Be Put On The Guestlist.’ ‘Cali’ is a reference to the super-strength California skunk-like weed it sells.

 

At Companies House, Rich Nerdz, which opened its doors at the start of the year, is listed as a bar serving food. Its sole director is Khabeer Khan, 30, who lists his occupation as ‘entrepreneur’.

In order to approach the organisers for comment, the MoS called the same number used by the Rich Nerdz cafe to direct guests to the venue. The number failed to connect but we followed up with a WhatsApp message and received a response threatening legal action for filming in a ‘private location’.

The messages were quickly deleted by the cafe’s branded WhatsApp account.

 

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7268303/Inside-Britains-secret-cannabis-cafes-Drug-dealers-peddling-super-strength-skunk-high-street.html

 

Vid On Link

 

1 Comment at this time

 

Legalise it.

 

JaneGrace, Welwyn, United Kingdom

 

Bongme 

 

 

 

 

 

Explosion in popularity of hemp products leaves Texas unable to bust marijuana users

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Explosion in popularity of hemp products leaves Texas unable to bust marijuana users

 

Prosecutors don’t have time or tools to distinguish between two strengths of plant

 

Independent

 

Texas politicians thought they were clear: the bill they overwhelmingly passed allowing the growth and sale of hemp had nothing to do with legalising cannabis.

“This is no slippery slope towards marijuana,” Charles Perry, a Republican state senator who sponsored the bill, said in May, according to The Dallas Morning News.

But since Greg Abbott signed the measure into law in June, county prosecutors around Texas have been dropping some marijuana possession charges and declining to file new ones, saying they do not have the time or the laboratory equipment needed to distinguish between legal hemp and illegal marijuana.

 

Collectively, the prosecutors’ jurisdictions cover more than 9 million people — about a third of Texas’ population — including in Houston, Austin and San Antonio.

The accidental leniency represents one of the unintended consequences states may face as they race to cash in on the popularity of products made with or from hemp.

 

Interest has surged in oils, gummies and other goods infused with CBD, or cannabidiol, which is processed from cannabis plants but does not produce a psychoactive effect.

The police and prosecutors in Florida are facing the same problem as their Texan colleagues after the Sunshine State legalised hemp in July.

 

“This is not just Texas,” said Peter Stout, president of the Houston Forensic Science Centre, which runs tests for the Houston Police Department and other agencies.

“Everybody is struggling with this.”

In Texas, prosecutors have already dropped scores of possession cases, and they’re not just throwing out misdemeanours.

 

The Travis County district attorney, Margaret Moore, announced this month that she was dismissing 32 felony possession and delivery of marijuana cases because of the law.

Ms Abbott and other state officials, including the attorney general, pushed back on Thursday, saying prosecutors should not be dropping cases because of the new legislation, known as H.B. 1325.

 

“Marijuana has not been decriminalised in Texas, and these actions demonstrate a misunderstanding of how H.B. 1325 works,” the officials, all Republicans, wrote in a letter to prosecutors.

Kim Ogg, the Harris County district attorney and a Democrat, shot back by saying that laboratory confirmation “has long been required” to prove someone’s guilt.

Before the legislation went into effect, laboratories had to identify hairs on marijuana flowers and test for the presence of cannabinoids, a process that required just a few minutes and a test strip that turned purple when it was positive.

 

 

Because the new law distinguishes between hemp and illicit marijuana, prosecutors say labs would now be required to determine the concentration of THC in the seized substance.

Mr Stout said he has been able to identify only two labs in the country that can make the fine distinction necessary and that are accredited in Texas. Both of them are private.

 

Prosecutors would need to pay the labs to run the tests — sometimes hundreds of dollars for each sample — and to testify about the results at trial.

Sending all of the state’s suspected marijuana to a small number of labs would likely overwhelm them, prosecutors have said, and would result in severe backlogs.

Still, many prosecutors agree with the governor and are continuing to charge and prosecute marijuana cases as usual.

The district attorney in El Paso, Jaime Esparza, a Democrat, said this month that the law “will not have an effect on the prosecution of marijuana cases in El Paso” and a spokeswoman confirmed that he had not thrown out any cases because of the law.

The sudden dismissals in other districts have been a welcome surprise for those who had been facing charges.

 

Brandon Ball, a lawyer, said one of his clients in Fort Bend County had been distraught about the possession charge she faced until it was unexpectedly dismissed.

She kept thanking him, but it wasn’t her lawyer who beat the case.

“I was trying to explain, it wasn’t me, it was this law,” Mr Ball said, referring to the hemp legislation.

Mr Ball, now an assistant public defender in Harris County, explained that test results are vital for prosecutors trying to prove that someone had an illegal substance.

“The law is constantly changing on what makes something illegal, based on its chemical makeup,” Mr Ball said.

“It’s important that if someone is charged with something, the test matches what they’re charged with.”

 

New York Times

 

 

 

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/us-politics/texas-cannabis-law-marjuana-legalisation-possession-hemp-weed-a9013776.html

 

Bongme

Christian company forced to rebrand after CBD name attracts cannabis fans

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Christian company forced to rebrand after CBD name attracts cannabis fans

 

Independent

 

Christian Book Distributors tire of fending off people looking for infused sweets and essential oils

 

 

A Christian publishing company has been forced to change its name from CBD after it was besieged with interest from people who thought they were selling cannabis products.

Christian Book Distributors have been known as CBD for decades, but in recent years the initials have become more familiar standing for cannabidiol, a non-hallucinatory substance derived from the cannabis plant.

The CBD firm has now rebranded itself as Christianbook, after tiring of constantly fending off approaches from people less interested in Bible and hymnbooks and more in cannabis-infused sweets, essential oils and medical treatments.

 

 

“A person may call up and say, ‘Hey, I’m looking for my order,’” Ray Hendrickson, the chief executive of the family-owned company, told the New York Times.

“It’s like, ‘What did you order? Oh, I ordered gummies.’ You don’t have the right company.”

 

 

Mr Hendrickson founded what is now Christianbook 40 years ago with his brother, Stephen, out of their parents’ home.

It has now grown into one of the world’s biggest distributors of Christian resources and employs 600 people to help sell books, DVDs, home-school products and music to the faithful.

 

 

The firm owns the website www.cbd.com, but when that is searched for online the results are instead dominated by cannabis.

Even Mr Hendrickson’s own mother has found the CBD initial confusing.

“I was driving my mum down the road recently,” he told the New York Times. “She saw a sign that said ‘CBD sold here.’ I was like, ‘No, mum. That’s not us.’”

 

 

Kraig Fox, chief executive of High Times, a monthly cannabis magazine, told the newspaper: “With the rapid rise of CBD and cannabis as legitimate industries, there is bound to be confusion in the marketplace.

“Especially in the online environment, some companies may actually see an increase in clicks as result of search engine algorithms or consumer misunderstanding, which may not actually be a bad thing. Others may see this as unwanted attention.”

 

Although CBD remains technically illegal under federal law in the US, it has become increasingly popular in sweets, lotions, sprays and even coffee.

 

Unlike THC, the active ingredient in cannabis which makes its users high, CBD is non-intoxicating and instead has some medicinal effects in treating seizures.

It is now legally available in 11 states and can even be bought in high street chemist chains in some parts of America.

CBD can also be lawfully bought in the UK and has never been scheduled as an illegal drug, provided it is pure and contains no THC.

Separately, some medical treatments derived from cannabis which do contain some THC can no be prescribed by specialist doctors after Sajid Javid, the home secretary, relaxed the regulations last year. 

 

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/cbd-cannabis-christian-book-distributors-weed-marijuana-a9013666.html

 

Bongme 

 

 

 

Beyonce’s dad Matthew Knowles’ bizarre career change as he swaps music for marijuana

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Beyonce’s dad Matthew Knowles’ bizarre career change as he swaps music for marijuana

 

Beyonce’s father Matthew Knowles has made a baffling change in career by moving in to the cannabis business

 

Mirror

 

 

0_MAIN-MAIN-Michael-Knowles.jpg

 

Beyonce’s dad Matthew Knowles has revealed his bizarre new career move as he switches one kind of greatest hits for another.

 former manager of superstar has partnered with Bangi Inc which buys and rents real estate for weed farms.

He recently told the New York Post Page Six, that despite smoking the drug for “medicinal reasons”, the company doesn’t actually handle the marijuana itself, just leases the land to the growers.

“I’m a marketing guy,” he explained.

 

 

I like to think outside the box. I like to be on the beginning of a trend and not at the end of it. We are buying land. We’ll lease it back to the growers, the dispensaries, the extraction companies.”

He seems to be following in the footsteps of his son in-law, Jay Z, who has joined cannabis company Caliva as chief brand strategist.

“We want to create something amazing, have fun in the process, do good and bring people along the way,” Jay Z said in a statement about his latest venture.

When Knowles was asked if the pair might work together, he responded: “It’s way to early to be having that conversation.”

 

Knowles used to manage his daughter Beyonce and her former group Destiny’s Child until she fired him in 2011 after a string of legal issues between the two.

Beyonce has always maintained that she has a good relationship with her father and that it has improved since they stopped working together.

She told host Oprah Winfrey in a 2013 interview that although separating from her father was “difficult,” they both “knew it was time”.

In October 2015, Knowles released his first book, The DNA Of Achievers: 10 Traits of Highly Successful Professionals.

 

https://www.mirror.co.uk/3am/beyonces-dad-matthew-knowles-bizarre-18439083

 

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Cops uncover £1m cannabis farm during Port Glasgow factory raid

hi

 

Cops uncover £1m cannabis farm during Port Glasgow factory raid

 

Cops have uncovered £1m worth of cannabis during a drugs factory raid in Port Glasgow.

More than 600 cannabis plants were seized from the disused lot on Muirsheil road after a member of the public reported a strong smelling odour coming from the building.

 

Inspector Julie MacDonald said police are now hunting for the producers behind the operation.

She said: “We received reports of a strong smell from the premises and officers attended.

 

“Entry was gained and a large-scale cannabis cultivation with an estimated street value of £985,408 was seized from the property.”

She added: “This recovery originated from an observant member of the public cooming to us with information that allowed us to act.

 

It shows how important information from the general public can be and I would urge anyone who hears, sees or notices anything they consider suspicious to get in touch with police.”

 

https://www.thescottishsun.co.uk/news/scottish-news/4507641/cannabis-one-million-port-glasgow-raid/

 

Vid On Link

 

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