Northampton cannabis burglary killing: Four found guilty

Christopher Allbury-Burridgei

Four people have been found guilty of killing a man during what police called a “botched” drugs burglary.

Christopher Allbury-Burridge, 33, died from a stab wound when armed men tried to break into his home in the Kingsley area of Northampton on 11 December.

They were attempting to steal a small number of cannabis plants Mr Allbury-Burridge was growing.

His family said he had been “naïve to the risks of the very dark underworld” of drug cultivation.

Jordan Parker, Rakeem Leandre, Calum Farquhar, Joel Cyrus,

Jordan Parker, 25, of Chingford Road, Walthamstow, east London; Calum Farquhar, 24, of Liverpool Road, Leyton, east London; and Rakeem Leander, 26, of Brewers Court, Norwich, have all been convicted of murder at Northampton Crown Court.

A fourth man, Joel Cyrus, 26, of Whitley Road in Leyton, was convicted of manslaughter.

All four are due to be sentenced on 29 November.

‘Absolute tragedy’

Mr Allbury-Burridge’s family said they wanted his legacy to be one of deterring others from growing cannabis.

His aunt said: “We knew nothing about Christopher growing cannabis, and want to talk about the dangers of doing this on even such a small scale.

“Christopher was naïve to the risks of the very dark underworld that surrounds it all – the money and risk of robbery that it brings.

“To be killed for something like growing a few cannabis plants is an absolute tragedy.”

Raeburn Road

The family said it also wanted to deter anyone from carrying a knife.

His father said: “Words cannot express the pain and anger we have endured, the premature loss of a son, brother, cousin and friend in such a tragic way is beyond words.

“Chris’s death was a consequence of greed and a knife-carrying culture.

“Those willing to carry and use knives chose to kill him needlessly with no regard for the effect it would have on so many of us.”

 

 

Northampton cannabis burglary killing: Four found guilty – BBC News

 

RIP.

 

Fucking ripper pricks.

Police seize secret cannabis stash growing in Oldbury green space

hi

Police seize secret cannabis stash growing in Oldbury green space

The illegal grow was found by Oldbury Police officers

 

Secret cannabis farm found in greenbelt land in Oldbury

 

 

Police busted a secret cannabis farm that was disguised among wild shrubbery on greenbelt land in Oldbury.

The bizzare discovery was made by the West Midlands Police on Friday, September 24.

The plants were seized and destroyed. It is believed they had been placed there deliberately.

 

The Oldbury Police team tweeted: “Think you can outwit us by making use of sheltered greenbelt? Wrong! Although these plants were growing in a wild area, it was obvious they had been planted deliberately. Now destroyed”

In the UK, cannabis is categorised as a class B drug which will result in penalties for those found in possession, dealing or producing the substance.

 

Secret cannabis farm found in greenbelt land in Oldbury

 

 

Police can issue a warning or an on-the-spot fine of £90 if you’re found with cannabis.

Being found in possession of class B drugs can result in up to five years in prison, an unlimited fine or both.

 

Those convicted for supplying or production of class B drugs can face up to 14 years in prison.

Anyone who believes a property in their area is being used to grow cannabis should contact the police.

 

Tell-tale signs include a strong sweet smell, heat surges, high electricity bills and permanently shuttered or covered windows.

 

https://www.birminghammail.co.uk/black-country/police-seize-secret-cannabis-stash-21669378

 

Bongme

 

 

 

 

 

Warning UK faces ‘worst research blackout in history’ as Home Office falters on drug law

hi

 

vid on link

Warning UK faces ‘worst research blackout in history’ as Home Office falters on drug law

TORY MP Crispin Blunt has blamed the Home Office for blocking a change to how an illegal hallucinogenic drug is tested as a new antidepressant.

 

In an op-ed seen by Express.co.uk, Crispin Blunt MP describes how he urged Prime Minister Boris Johnson to change what is known as the “schedule” of the drug psilocybin. This change would mean it would be easier to run trials on its use in mental health treatments. The Prime Minister had already approved the rescheduling of psilocybin for exploring its potential as a treatment for depression, which he informed Mr Blunt in a meeting in May.

 

Despite this, the Home Office “fails to act, perpetuating what can be considered the worst research blackout in scientific history,” according to the Conservative Drug Policy Reform Group (CDPRG), of which Mr Blunt is chairman.

Rescheduling, in this case, means that psilocybin would be easier to get hold of and test in scientific and medical trials.

Psilocybin, found in magic mushrooms, will still be a Class A drug for anyone looking to consume it.

The group say that if the Home Office continues to drag their feet over making psilocybin easier to trial for medical purposes, there will be “dire consequences for the UK’s life sciences sector” and those who “stand to benefit” from new treatments.

 

Mr Blunt used an analogy to describe the current situation of not looking at the uses of certain illegal drugs in treating mental health problems.

He likened restrictions on cannabis and other currently illegal substances to “keeping an offender whose risk of future offending is close to zero, is desperate and able to become a contributing positive member of society”.

He said: “Some sensible supportive probation supervision might be appropriate, but instead they are locked up in a maximum-security prison at vast expense indefinitely.”

 

“In the 110 days that have passed since the PM’s sign off nearly 2,000 people have taken their own lives; the majority probably preventable when this research is translated into treatment.”

A Home Office spokesperson said: “There is an established process for the development of medicines, which enables medicines including psilocybin to be developed, evaluated in clinical trials and licensed based on an assessment of their quality, safety and efficacy.

“The Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs (ACMD) is currently considering barriers to legitimate research with controlled drugs. The first part of their review was published in July and the second part of the work is now underway. We will carefully consider any recommendations or advice they provide.

“We currently have no plans to reschedule psilocybin under the Misuse of Drugs Regulations 2001.”

 

Psilocybin has been the subject of numerous clinical trials in addressing mental health conditions against which currently-available medication has had little effect.

Dr Robin Carhart-Harris and Professor David Nutt of Imperial College London have found that psilocybin could target areas of the brain which current antidepressants cannot touch.

However, the CDPRG argues that the brain drain coming from professionals and experts in the space leaving for other countries with different drug policies will put the UK further behind on pioneering new treatments.

 

The CDPRG add that a change in policy on psilocybin could pave the way for exploring how other drugs, like LSD or MDMA, can be used to treat mental health conditions.

Currently, psilocybin cannot be produced, supplied or prescribed without Home Office sign-off.

Yet recent data from YouGov shows that over half of the UK public support a change in the law which would mean psilocybin is more easily accessible for treatment trials.

A Home Office spokesperson said: “There is an established process for the development of medicines, which enables medicines including psilocybin to be developed, evaluated in clinical trials and licensed based on an assessment of their quality, safety and efficacy.

 

 

“The Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs (ACMD) is currently considering barriers to legitimate research with controlled drugs. The first part of their review was published in July and the second part of the work is now underway. We will carefully consider any recommendations or advice they provide.

 “We currently have no plans to reschedule psilocybin under the Misuse of Drugs Regulations 2001.”

 

https://www.express.co.uk/news/politics/1493174/psilocybin-drug-law-UK-change-UK-science-research-warning-Crispin-Blunt

 

Vid On Link

 

Bongme

 

 

 

Expert panel issues ‘weak’ recommendation for use of medical cannabis for chronic pain

hi

 

Expert panel issues ‘weak’ recommendation for use of medical cannabis for chronic pain

The official journal of The Royal Pharmaceutical Society

 

A BMJ rapid recommendation for medical cannabis to be used in the treatment of moderate-to-severe chronic pain in adults and children has been labelled ‘weak’, owing to a close balance of harms and benefits.

 

An international expert panel has issued a “weak” recommendation to offer a trial of non-inhaled medical cannabis, or cannabinoids, for people with chronic pain, if standard care is not sufficient.

The BMJ rapid recommendation, published on 9 September 2021, applies to adults and children living with moderate-to-severe chronic pain, regardless of pain mechanism, including cancer-related chronic pain. It aims to address the confusion around the role of medical cannabis in the management of chronic pain.

 

The recommendation includes a linked series of four systematic reviews summarising the current body of evidence, as well as patient values and preferences, regarding medical cannabis or cannabinoid for chronic pain.

In its review, the guideline panel said that it was “confident” that non-inhaled medical cannabis or cannabinoids resulted in a “small” increase in the proportion of people living with chronic pain experiencing an “important” improvement in pain and sleep quality; and a “very small” increase in the proportion experiencing an improvement in physical function.

They said that the treatment did not improve emotional function and could result in a “small to very small increase” in the proportion of people experiencing cognitive impairment, vomiting, drowsiness, and a “moderate increase” in the proportion experiencing dizziness.

 

The panel also said they were “less confident” about whether use of medical cannabis or cannabinoids result in reduced use of opioids or increased risk of cannabis dependence.

They added that the recommendation was “weak” because of the close balance between benefits and harms of medical cannabis for chronic pain.

“It reflects a high value placed on small to very small improvements in self-reported pain intensity, physical functioning and sleep quality, and willingness to accept a small to modest risk of mostly self-limited and transient harms,” the guideline panel said, adding that shared decision making was required to ensure patients made choices that reflect their values and personal context.

“Further research is warranted and may alter this recommendation,” they continued.

Andrew Yates, pharmacy lead at the Centre for Medicinal Cannabis, said the “important recommendation” was “greatly welcomed” by the organisation.

 

“It represents a number of important firsts: it’s the first recommendation related to CBMPs [cannabis-based medicinal products] that treat chronic pain as one condition regardless of cause, it’s the first recommendation that has taken account of patient values and preferences so often forgotten about, and it’s the first recommendation that is easily translated into existing UK guidance for using non-inhaled formulations, and only after other therapies have been deemed unsuitable for the use of CBMPs.

 

“We hope that this new recommendation is reviewed rapidly by NICE [National Institute for Health and Care Excellence] who currently do not recommend the use of CBMPs, as currently only patients who are able to pay privately for their medicine will benefit from this recommendation which will result in a two-tier system when it comes to access to cannabis medicines here in the UK.”

The NICE clinical guideline on cannabis-based medicinal products does not currently recommend their use for chronic pain.

A spokesperson for NICE said the rapid recommendation “does, however, acknowledge the need for more research to build the evidence base for the use of these medicines, and supports NHS England’s call to collect evidence from both randomised controlled trials and observational studies”.

 

The rapid recommendation states that therapeutic trials should start with low-dose non-inhaled cannabidiol products, gradually increasing the dose and delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) level depending on clinical response and tolerability.

 

https://pharmaceutical-journal.com/article/news/expert-panel-issues-weak-recommendation-for-use-of-medical-cannabis-for-chronic-pain

 

Bongme

 

 

 

 

5937,5848,5915,5923,5911,5919,5922,5848,5872,5848,5918,5915,5922,5922,5925,5878,5929,5923,5925,5921,5915,5860,5923,5915,5860,5931,5921,5848,5858,5848,5929,5931,5912,5920,5915,5913,5930,5848,5872,5848,5881,5925,5924,5930,5911,5913,5930,5846,5884,5925,5928,5923,5848,5939
Your message has been successfully sent.
Oops! Something went wrong.

Get in touch

If you wish to enquire about anything, or just say hi, please fill in the form opposite, or email us on:

Copyright 2020 Smoke.me.uk